18
Feb

Public Works Merges With Sequoia Consulting Group

2016-02-18_1612Here’s the first big development that I told you recently was coming in 2016: As of this week, my company, Public Works LLC, has merged with Sequoia Consulting Group – enabling us to offer a more comprehensive range of services and a unique, new top-to-bottom approach to the public sector: 

— Futures Planning. As you know, between teaching The Future of Government at the UChicago’s Harris School of Public Policy and writing for publications like The Atlantic, US News & World Report, and Foreign Affairs, I’ve been working more and more on what the future holds. Now, we’ll be able to integrate that orientation with the fast-emerging field of data analytics to give elected officials and their top managers hard, actionable, real-time, data-based recommendations to identify, reduce, and turn to their advantage impending financial, economic, policy, and organizational risks.

— Policy. Public Works is already a pioneer in on-going, high-level public policy and strategic planning for governors, agency heads, and other chief executives around the country. We’ve been especially focused over the years on reimagining “human services,” broadly defined to encompass everything where governments act directly on individuals (as opposed to issuing rules and regulations) from health and social services to corrections, education and workforce training, which together comprise roughly two-thirds of public spending at all levels of government. You can read some of my articles on this here, here and here.

We’ll be expanding on all that – especially in education.  More on that next week.

— Supporting Functions. Public Works already has a proven record of helping individual agencies and entire governments redesign their operations and improve their bottom lines through our performance and efficiency reviews; joining with Sequoia allows us to add a broad range of analytic, financial, and IT infrastructure that governments need to reduce red ink, put things in the black, and keep everything running effectively.

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Look for more information in the weeks ahead. In the meantime, I welcome your comments, as always.

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3
Feb

The Winter of Worldwide Discontent

Donald-Trump-Baseball-hat The political world is ablaze this week with post-Iowa and pre-New Hampshire analysis.  In my latest post for US News & World Report, The Winter of Worldwide Discontent, I use the occasion to step back and look at the broader issue of how we got here.

As you know if you’ve been reading my posts the last few months, I think “here” is a worldwide, across-the-political-spectrum disillusionment with elites.  I’ve spent the last several weeks pointing out how this phenomenon is worldwide; this week, I wanted to emphasize that the disillusionment isn’t simply with politics and government as usual:  It’s rooted in massive economic disappointment for most people, everywhere.  Eventually, this will mean economic, not just political, change.

Yes, people think politicians are both ineffectual and corrupt, in the pockets of special interests and unresponsive to their needs – but that’s a problem because the existing economic order is failing them and they want some redress.  If anyone thinks the rising anger of electorates everywhere will be sated by a change in the names and faces at the top of governments, they’re kidding themselves:  People everywhere – not just the suicidal, marginalized, older white males who have started getting attention lately – think the entire economic and social order is rigged against them in a way that hasn’t been seen on this scale since the revolutionary era of 1776-1848.

In my next post, I plan to address what can and should be done about it.  In the meantime, two-thirds of GOP voters and half of Democrats in Iowa have said they want something radically different from what their respective party leadership present – and those are the folks who have enough confidence in the political system to turn out for it.  Next week, it’s expected that strong majorities will vote for the insurgent populist candidacies of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders.  The Establishments may wrest back control of the process and (as I’ve predicted for a while, will) nominate Marco Rubio and Hillary Clinton.  But that won’t end the insurgency.

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