29
Sep

Guess Who’s Coming to The Greater Good Gathering?

Martin Luther King III, Harvard historian, “Top Global Thinker” on technology, state and local government innovators, established and rising social entrepreneurs – and you

 The program for The Greater Good Gathering continues to expand and firm up.  I wanted to let you know of new additions just this week – and encourage you to get your conference registration and hotel reservations in ASAP, while the Early Bird rates are still in effect.

Here are the headlines:

Conference Keynoter:  The big news is that Martin Luther King III will deliver a keynote speech at the Saturday conference session, speaking on Doing Good in the 21st Century.  In addition, Johnny J. Mack, former Chief Administrative Officer of the MLK, Jr. Center in Atlanta will moderate a Saturday panel on the future of economic justice.

Framing the Future:  In what we hope will provide an interesting change-of-pace, a pair of very different thought-leaders will provide brief presentations and Q&A with attendees on the deeper issues that frame our entire discussion. In his latest book, Once Within BordersHarvard historian Charles Maier tracks the epochal changes that have defined territories over five centuries and pays close attention to our present moment, asking in what ways modern nations and economies still live within borders and to what degree our societies have moved toward a post-territorial world.  He’ll be followed by Dr. Kalev Hannes Leetaru, one of the leading innovators of the internet era, and one of Foreign Policy Magazine’s Top 100 Global Thinkers, who will address where technology is taking government and the nation-state in the future.

Government Innovation:  Some of the most innovative leaders in Rhode Island state government will be joining several of our panels, including Governor Gina Raimondo’s advisors on government innovation and Macky McCleary, a business-process innovator who now heads the state’s public utilities commission and formerly was director of business regulation.  Governor Raimondo and Senate Sheldon Whitehouse, who just published a book on cleaning up the federal government, have also been invited to appear on the Friday dinner panel discussing the future of government, moderated by former Delaware Governor Jack Markell.

Social Venture Funders:  The leaders of several different creative social venture funds – doing for social progress what venture capital did for technology – will be discussing how approaches to social change are quickly evolving.  Kim Syman, Managing Partner of New Profit in Boston, and Kelly Ramirez, CEO of Social Enterprise Greenhouse in Providence, are incubating some of the leading creative solutions, both for-profit and not-for-profit, to a range of social challenges, and they’ll be telling us about what these are and what else they see on the horizon.

Innovative Entrepreneurs: We’re lining up a number of creative doers implementing business models to drive social change.  These include established business leaders like Maximilian Weiner, who has founded a social enterprise in the Inclusive Insurance space that is providing low and moderate income Americans with free insurance – and rising stars who are current Brown students or recent graduates, like Stefanie Kaufman, the founder and Executive Director of Project LETS, which advocates for disability rights and creates inclusive communities for people with mental illness.

If this sounds good to you, get your conference registration and hotel reservations in this week, while lower rates last.

And please share this invitation.

Best,

 

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26
Sep

Join in the Greater Good

The Greater Good Gathering is fast approaching. The program is coming together, and I hope we can count on seeing you there for a weekend of discussion on technology, change, the future of government and public policy, and how best to advance the greater good in the 21st Century. All we need is for you to complete your registration today. Reduced prices on rooms and meals end on Friday.

The conference will be held in Providence, Rhode Island, Friday evening, October 20, through Sunday lunch, October 22.

The panels and speakers include:

  • Can Government Be Saved? A kick-off dinner discussion with an innovative former governor, a state finance director who found a unique way to partner with the private sector to build out a technology background, and the founder of Boston’s Office of new Urban Mechanics.
  • The Future Of The Public Good. A leading national political spokesperson moderates a panel including a leading expert on technology and law, a specialist on American community, and a civic engagement social entrepreneur.
  • Technology And Power: A History Of The Future. An historian will provide perspective on the rise and fall of nation-states and territorial governance, and one of Foreign Policy Magazine’s Top 100 Global Thinkers will take us forward into what technology means for the future of states and governments.
  • Up-and-Coming Innovators. Over lunch, young social entrepreneurs will discuss the innovative social ventures they’re launching.
  • Coffee With Kim: We will transition over lunch into talking about new models of social change with a coffee discussion between me and Kim Syman of New Profit, a social venture fund, about some of the new developments in both the social venture and for-profit worlds.
  • Public Good Beyond The Public Sector. An array of for-profit and non-profit social innovators – bringing financing, insurance, educational and other opportunities to underserved populations – will discuss their efforts to harness market forces for the greater good.
  • New Models Of Economic Empowerment. Saturday will conclude with a discussion of how to empower the economically disenfranchised in a market-driven world, including activists who broke new ground in labor organizing, in driving consumer pressure for better worker treatment, and in taking the civil rights movement into the 21st Century.
  • A Networking Breakfast for tomorrow’s leaders to meet with today’s.
  • Application & Illustration: Health Care. We will draw the conference themes together – the changing nature of democracy and public policy in the face of technological change, and the resulting emerging responses in not just the public but also the private and “third” sectors – through their application in a specific policy area: in this case, the issue dominating the US political system in 2017, health care.  We will explore the role of government in health policy and how it’s playing out with Obamacare and beyond, delving into the intersection between public and private sectors, as well as the ability (and, in fact, increasing reality) of innovative, Greater Good-oriented insurers and providers – not just government – to drive these changes through the market. Panelists include the original directors of both national and Rhode Island Obamacare implementation, the leader of the state-level movement to provide Medicaid coverage to all, and private-sector health care innovators.
  • Closing Discussion: A chance for all of us to talk together about how to move forward and next steps.

We need you there – but space is limited (and so is the time to register and get the lowest room rates).

Please let us know today that you’re coming: https://www.greatergoodgathering.org/registration

And don’t forget to reserve a room: https://www.greatergoodgathering.org/conference-fee-hotel.

And please share this invitation.

 

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6
Sep

Of Good … and Evil

 



It was an unusually busy August! I’d like to update you on a few goings-on – most importantly, the Greater Good Gathering that I described in my last update. This is the first annual “Greater Good” conference, Democracy, Citizenship, and the Greater Good: Charting a Path in Changing Times, part of a larger, long-term effort aimed at the future.

The Gathering is now set for October 20-22 (Friday evening through Sunday lunchtime) in Providence, Rhode Island. We are in the process of finalizing the program, with a fantastic lineup of speakers already confirmed, and other panelists we are waiting to confirm. Most importantly, the Greater Good Gathering official website is now live, where you can stay up-to-date on the program, register and book your hotel rooms at the historic Biltmore Hotel, Providence, Rhode Island, where the Gathering will be held.

As you’ll see, confirmed speakers already include a former governor, a law professor on cybersecurity advising the World Intellectual Property Organization, a nationally-recognized communications expert, award-winning advocates for their work addressing human trafficking, the CEO of a major health care reform organization, the author of the nation’s first “Medicaid-For-All” legislation, the first woman and youngest person ever to lead a major AFL-CIO labor federation, one of Foreign Policy Magazine’s Top 100 Global Thinkers, and the co-founder of the Boston Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics – among others.

We’ll be discussing:

-Public Sector Innovation:  Can Government Be Saved?

-Defending Democracy & The Future of the Public Good

-Technology and Power: A History of the Future

-Up and Coming Innovators

-Public Good Beyond the Public Sector

-Application & Illustration: Health Care

There will also be plenty of time for networking and mentoring. Conference registration includes a welcome dinner, and healthy full breakfasts and lunches, at the Biltmore Hotel. Space is limited, so please register today.

Meanwhile, in the last month, our country has been fraying in ways unseen since the civil rights and Vietnam War era. As I wrote a few weeks ago in Government Untethered: “Some people find frightening the notion that countries as we know them – including our own – are on the verge of splitting apart. Others find it crazy. Scrolling through my news feed on a single, representative day last week … I found it simply to be the new normal.” Concluding with the story of the Venezuelan opposition’s attempts to create essentially a parallel, virtual democracy in the face of an increasingly-authoritarian government, I asked whether, in the long term,

a government, and its army, [can] hold territory where it has lost large swaths of the population? As people increasingly find the means to unite and construct self-governing mechanisms outside of “government,” can they actually opt-out of governments that don’t represent them? That’s a proposition that Venezuelans will be testing in coming weeks…. This isn’t just esoteric futurism anymore: It’s the daily news.

But, despite the new-technology veneer, all of this has roots that go back to the very beginnings of human civilization. In The Age-Old Rural Conflict, I wrote about the famous story of Cain and Abel as allegory for the triumph of settled agriculture – the New Economy of its day – over pastoralism. Cain is then portrayed in the Bible as, not coincidentally, moving on from murdering his herdsman brother to founding a major city.

The Cain and Abel story reflects a particular incident – the transition to settled agriculture and, as a result, urbanism – in the long history of technological change killing off prior economic, and attendant cultural and religious, arrangements. Such transitions aren’t peaceful, and they haven’t ended. The resulting sense of threat and hostility can reach Biblical proportions.

I’m thinking about both Good and Evil more right now, as I’ll be teaching a new course about them – called “Deep Policy” – this winter at Union Theological Seminary. Instead of talking about what policies might best address the challenges we face in such areas as crime control, inequality, discrimination, repression, environmental destruction, or a host of others, the course will ask, What drives these challenges to begin with and what – if anything – can we do to prevent them? To do this, we will draw upon and attempt to synthesize a wide range of disciplines, from theology and philosophy to chaos and game theory, ethics to evolutionary biology, psychology to economics – and, of course, public policy. In short, we will take an interdisciplinary approach to how wrong occurs – and how to right it.

I’ll have more on these subjects – and a few other upcoming conferences I’m organizing – in future updates.

As always, I look forward to hearing from you in the comments below.

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